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grumpyvette
09-20-2010, 08:19 AM
for a GOOD job, at a minimum, youll want to remove ALL the oil passage plugs , and clean the block out with solvent and high pressure air, and some rifle bore brushes, run thru the passages.
now obviously you won,t be the first guy that thinks of just installing a new cam, changing the oil and filter , maybe flushing the engine out a bit with a quart of diesel fuel added to the old oil, for about 2 minutes of idle time just before changing the oil etc., and while those practices do occasionally let you get by, thats not the correct route and it leaves a significant amount of metallic crud in the oil passages , the fact that people do occasionally get by with a semi clean engine is tribute to how well the factory lube system and oil filter functions,
but betting on those bearings and the new cam and lifters not being scored by the retained metallic debris, is at best a gamble, where your putting far more than the new cam and lifters at risk
to do the job correctly Remove ALL oil passage plugs. Those are the 2-3 at each end of the cam, depending on if its a bbc or sbc ,don,t forget the one under the rear main cap, and the one in the left deck at the rear. Removing the, main ,bearings and rotating assembly and carefully inspect and clean those components,remove the cam bearings, as the oil passage that feeds oil to the main bearings is behind them, and if there is ANY metallic crud retained AT ALL in the oil passages and if you don,t remove the bearings and clean the oil passages with a brush and high pressure air theres bound to be some retained, you can be certain that metallic debris, which will get flushed RIGHT DIRECTLY INTO your brand-new main bearings, lifters and cam lobes, during the first 10 minutes the new engines running, when you crank the new motor up, resulting in scored bearings and a highly increased chance of the new cam failing

LINK FOR OIL PASSAGE LOCATION INFO [/size]

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=120

http://garage.fasterdeals.com/SBCOiling.gif

http://www.se-r.net/engine/block_prep.html


http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=4294


http://www.hotrodpitstop.com/engine-block-prep.php
Cleaning Your Engine Block

Engine builders usually charge around $120 to clean a block, and most racers consider it money well spent to avoid the hassle. The engine builders usually use a mild acid or caustic wash, either in a hot tank or a jet sprayer. Whether you choose to do it yourself or have your engine shop handle the duties, make sure the freeze and gallery plugs are removed beforehand so that anything hidden behind them can get out. After all the machining processes are complete, the block needs to be cleaned again to get rid of any accumulated machining oils and metal slivers left over from cutting.


Cleaning is a necessary step even if you are using a brand-new block. New blocks can often have casting slag hanging around in the cracks and crevices, and it becomes a big, gritty problem if not removed before assembly. This is a step you can definitely do yourself. If the block is new, all you need is a water hose and a variety of brushes to make sure you scrub everything. If you are cleaning a rebuild, however, the work gets tougher. You need to use hot water and a cleaner capable of cutting through the grease and grime that builds up just about everywhere. When you are finished, make sure to hit all the surfaces with a light coat of WD-40 or some other type of light oil as soon as the surface has been dried to prevent rust.


Replace The Freeze Plugs

If you have your freeze plugs in place, it's also a good idea to pressure test the block before beginning the big projects. Pressure testing is done by filling the water jackets and then adding air pressure to see if there are any cracks or leaks. Both of these processes should be repeated after all the machine work is done to make sure you didn't cut too much away. Many machinists say they have seen situations in which a chunk of casting slag that was knocked away during one of the cutting procedures opens a pinhole through to a water jacket. The only way to catch this is with a final pressure check before engine assembly begins.

Sonic and Pressure Testing Your Race Engine Block

It doesn't make sense to do machine work on a block that may not even be usable. That's why it's wise to sonic test the block before much effort is put into it. Sonic testing can tell you the thickness of the cylinder walls quickly and easily. Even on a new block, this is important because core shift can cause one side of a cylinder wall to be too thin. Engine builder Peter Guild of PME Engines says he likes to see the cylinder wall thickness at least 0.275 inch. A sonic tester is also capable of catching a block that's just too far gone to be rebuilt again


related threads

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=2886&p=7496&hilit=sprayer#p7496

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=1077&p=2078&hilit=+pressure+water#p2078

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OBVIOUSLY USE OF A PRESSURE WASHER AND OR A DECENT AIR COMPRESSOR, and SOME good GREASE SOLVENT HAS ADVANTAGES, and use of QUALITY OIL FILTERS and INSTALLING HIGH TEMP, MAGNETS to trap any metallic crud you might miss helps



RELATED INFO YOULL WANT TO READ
http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2080&p=5568&hilit=magnets#p5568

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grumpyvette
10-01-2010, 11:00 AM
theres hundreds of ways to destroy an engine, but a common route is trying to compress solid objects in the combustion chamber,where theres not nearly enough clearance,or having the valve train bind up due to clearance issues or reveing the engine above its valve control limitations.
failure to keep the pistons from hitting the valves, bending valves, ,over reveing the valve train and having un-controlled valve movement, or having chunks of piston,that detonation can break loose, being compressed against the heads,can result in the cracked cylinders, and bent rods like the pictures below show
http://www.grumpysperformance.com/crackedbore.jpg
http://www.grumpysperformance.com/crackedbore1.jpg
http://www.grumpysperformance.com/bustedvalve.jpg
http://www.grumpysperformance.com/blockcrack.jpg
http://www.grumpysperformance.com/brokemaincap.jpg

Poltergeist
10-01-2010, 01:00 PM
Grumpy I see the piston is cracked in the above pics but is the cylinder also? Looks like but hard to tell for sure. And if the rod end broke like that what happened to the crank??

grumpyvette
10-01-2010, 03:41 PM
Grumpy I see the piston is cracked in the above pics but is the cylinder also? Looks like but hard to tell for sure. And if the rod end broke like that what happened to the crank??

yes the cylinder walls are cracked

1983SS454
10-01-2010, 10:35 PM
I can see the crack in the cylinder wall.. it never gets old looking at cracked metal. I do NDT for a living on military helicopters. Its very similar to the MPI and FPI tests That machine shops do on engines